Scholars

Allevato, Eugene: Mathematics & Science, Woodbury University

Will an Instructional Model Focusing on Why rather than How Relieve Math Anxiety and Promote Success in Remedial Math?

Focusing on underlying reasons rather than procedures is not the traditional approach to teaching remedial mathematics. An analysis of student performance on a common final has shown this non-traditional approach leads to significant improvement as compared to students taught with a standard lecture method emphasizing computation and memorization. Additional data gathered from over 200 remedial algebra students taught with this non-traditional emphasis include reflective journals and mathematical biographies (mathographies). The mathographies give students the opportunity to express their feelings about mathematics and math-related disciplines in writing. Their writing is a far richer representation of their views and anxieties than what can be obtained from the rating scales on standard mathematics anxiety diagnostic tools such as MARS (Mathematics Anxiety Rating System) and Strong-Campbell Interest Inventory (SCII). How this data can be analyzed is central to this scholarly investigation to shed light on the efficacy of emphasizing Why over How.

  • Keywords: Mathematics Anxiety, Independent Learner, Remedial Mathematics.
  • Mentor Group: Jackie Dewar
  • Scholar Session 4: Saturday, 6/2, 2:00pm – 3:15pm

Bhatia, Kavita: Mathematics, University of Wisconsin Marshfield/Wood City

Using Think Alouds to Remove Bottlenecks in Mathematics

Students in integral calculus very often face difficulties in problems involving applications to physics like work and pressure problems. It is unclear whether their difficulties are due to lack of understanding of the main concept of integral calculus, or whether it is difficulty in actually applying the concept to a physical situation like a work problem. A study was conducted using think alouds in which six students of varying abilities were asked to solve problems ranging from simple to fairly complex. The recordings were transcribed and rated to identify possible bottlenecks in the problem solving process.

  • Keywords: Calculus, Think Alouds.
  • Mentor Group: Curt Bennett
  • Scholar Session 4: Saturday, 6/2, 2:00pm – 3:15pm

Bhavsar, Victoria: Plant Science, Cal Poly Pomona

"Slow Teaching" -- Learning in Person

Much, if not most, of the recent scholarship of teaching in many disciplines has focused on the use of digital technologies to enhance learning. I am concerned that an uncritical acceptance of the technological environment for learning feeds into consumer culture. Pedagogically, I believe there has not been enough time to investigate these technologies for their impact on deep learning of different content. My class, a gen-ed class not followed by other classes in the same topic for most students, needs to provide an environment in which learning has a fighting chance to send down a taproot. My central question is: what non-technological strategies work best with students who are so steeped in technology that their brains are genuinely different from mine? Or, given their world – full of quick encounters of all kinds, from 30-second youtube lectures to half-hour hookups to fast food eaten running to the next class – is there even value in slower, deeper experiences?

  • Keywords: Deep Learning, Reflection, Food and Agriculture, Non-Digital Active Learning.
  • Mentor Group: Kathy Flecky
  • Scholar Session 1: Friday, 6/1, 9:45am – 11:00am

Domizi, Denise: Center for Teaching and Learning, University of Georgia

Exploring Graduate Seminars as a Community of Practice

Communities of Practice (CoP) are comprised of individuals with a common interest or passion who meet regularly (in person or virtually) to share ideas and interact (Wenger, 1998) with the goal of knowledge-building (Wenger & Snyder, 2000). This research will explore graduate seminars on university teaching where graduate students interact with and learn from other graduate students across campus and disciplines. Indeed, a goal of these courses is to help graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) form a CoP where they can explore their ideas about teaching and learning; improve their effectiveness in the classroom through practice, reflection, and discussion with the instructor and other GTAs; and find a supportive community for teaching. My research questions will explore 1) if and how multidisciplinary graduate seminars on university teaching become a CoP, and 2) if and how there is a change in GTAs' attitudes about teaching with sustained, semester-long conversations about teaching.

  • Keywords: Community of Practice, Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs), TA training.
  • Mentor Group: Kathy Flecky
  • Scholar Session 3: Saturday, 6/2, 10:30am – 11:45am

Ecklund, Joseph: Office of Student Success, Creighton University

Addressing the Academic Motivation of Underachieving Students

Our institution offers a 2-credit hour spring course entitled Strategies for Student Success (RSP 130). Students are required to enroll in RSP 130 by the Dean's office, based on a fall semester GPA of 2.0 or below. These students have admissions profiles that typically would predict future academic success. It is for this reason that RSP 130 is more focused on student motivation and behavior and less focused on cognitive skills and ability. The primary course content of RSP 130 includes motivational theory, a study of emotional intelligence and small group sessions coordinated by the Counseling Center. This course reaches students who have experienced an imbalance between the academic rigor, their own personal expectations for success, and the environmental conditions found within a high achieving intellectual community. This project will explore the impact of teaching motivational content on the academic success of underachieving students in a classroom and related counseling setting. Keywords: Motivation, Success Course, Counseling, Underachieving Students.

  • Keywords: Motivation, Success Course, Counseling, Underachieving Students.
  • Mentor Group: Pat Coward
  • Scholar Session 1: Friday, 6/1, 9:45am – 11:00am

Feldman, Nancy: Social Work, Touro College

Enhancing Graduate Social Work Students' Capacity to Negotiate Tensions That Arise in the Consideration of Psychopathology

My research investigates what kind of structures and processes are needed for social work students to effectively embrace multiple and often contradictory perspectives in the consideration of psychopathology. Students tend to get polarized in the face of expectations to function within the dominant paradigm of mental health and mental illness—a psychiatric medical model point of view—and to question and at times challenge that paradigm, a task considered by many as necessary for ethical practice. I have been combining metacognitive strategies and Vygotskian influenced small group work in an effort to enhance student capacity in this area. Initial data from online discussion board posts, group and individual assignments, and instructor observation suggest the effectiveness of this approach. I would like to further develop my project by discovering and/or developing tools that aid in the collection, management, and analysis of data to become increasingly systematic in my investigation.

  • Keywords: Metacognition, Critical Thinking, Zones of Proximal Development, Mental Health Practice.
  • Mentor Group: Pat Coward
  • Scholar Session 3: Saturday, 6/2, 10:30am – 11:45am

Ferguson, Janet: Adolescence Education, Canisius College

The Effect of Online Courses on Pre-Service Teacher's Performance in Student Teaching

The main question of this research is aimed at answering whether taking online courses in a graduate teacher certification program will effect performance in the student teaching placement, when compared to peers who did not take any of their teacher preparation courses online. The approach for this research is to collect data in the form of a comprehensive assessment completed by the supervising/cooperating teacher who has had the student teacher in their classroom for one of their seven week placements. Students who had taken one or more online courses will be compared to those who took only face to face courses. The students will be compared in the areas of Knowledge, Service and Professionalism/Leadership to determine if there are significant differences between the two group means. This proposed research will benefit all those who prepare pre-service teachers and are considering or already using online courses in their programs.

  • Keywords: Online Learning, Pre-Service Teachers, Student Teaching.
  • Mentor Group: Kathy Flecky
  • Scholar Session 2: Friday, 6/1, 2:45pm – 4:00pm

Grovas, Lesa: Nursing, Creighton University

Correlation of Student Learning Preferences to their Academic Success

This study will seek to discern what learning preferences students use to achieve academic success. When students leave a university due to academic failure; it is a loss for both the student and the school. In an effort to avoid student attrition, universities have developed intervention strategies to assist at risk students. An element of these strategies is recommending specific resources. Students of today have many new and exciting learning resources available to them. As educators, we all want our students to succeed by providing them resources which will be of value. The results of this study will guide faculty in directing at risk students to learning resources which will help lead them toward academic success.

  • Keywords: Student Success, Student Attrition, Learning Resources.
  • Mentor Group: Kathleen Perkins
  • Scholar Session 2: Friday, 6/1, 2:45pm – 4:00pm

Hegamin-Younger, Cecilia: Public Health and Preventive Medicine, St. George's University

Developing an Assessment System

The accountability movement has reached colleges. Student learning outcomes, academic progress benchmarks and demonstrated learning goals mean the same thing. Not only do we have to say what our students should know after a class is completed, but we must prove that they know it. Instructors can translate their own assessment data into information that directly measures progress. This project will demonstrate and lead instructors in developing and implementing a grading and reporting assessment system that allows them to track and monitor each student's progress toward meeting student-learning outcomes. The benefits of this system are to actively engage students in the learning process through enhanced communication of the student's strengths and weaknesses; enhance the student-centered learning environment through increased communication of student performance with faculty, administrators, academic advisors and other professionals promoting student success throughout the program; and identify faculty development opportunities to improve teaching effectiveness.

  • Keywords: Academic Progress, Learner-Centered, Integrated Curriculum, Formative Assessment.
  • Mentor Group: Julie Lochbaum
  • Scholar Session 2: Friday, 6/1, 2:45pm – 4:00pm

Hertel, John: Law, US Air Force Academy

Understanding Student Characteristics, Student Performance, Instructor, and Classroom Differences Between Honors and Non-Honors Courses

If you set high expectations, will honors students in honors courses rise more readily than non-honors students in core (general education) courses? What can we say about the learning, behaviors, and attitudes of students in these two categories of courses? And, what will be the impact of translating some of the pedagogical approaches typically used in honors courses to non-honors courses? We are exploring three categories of factors: student characteristics, instructor characteristics, and pedagogies. Little is found in the literature concerning attempts to empirically validate the effectiveness of honors programs, yet many hint that these factors have a significant impact on student learning. We began by examining students in a required undergraduate Law course, paying particular attention to these factors through common assessments, classroom observations, questionnaires, and focus groups. We seek to learn more on how to interpret our data and refine our next studies.

  • Keywords: Honors Courses, Empirical Data, Student Learning.
  • Mentor Group: Kathleen Perkins
  • Scholar Session 4: Saturday, 6/2, 2:00pm – 3:15pm

Horejes, Thomas: Sociology, Gallaudet University

Visualizing the Criminal Justice System through Bilingualism: English and American Sign Language

At Gallaudet University whose mission incorporates bilingualism for the deaf and hard-of-hearing students in higher education, the dynamics of an ideal course is one that enhances visual learning and dealing with linguistic diversity. I discuss video clips of my visual classroom & management of linguistic diversity as documented evidence to assess my teaching approach as an academic tool to provide alternative ways of learning about the CJ system for students. What sessions and assignments appear to show the strongest evidence of great teaching? When are some identifying periods throughout the semester ("ah-ha moments") that demonstrates a particularly compelling 'coming together' of the various elements of CJ system especially when students' linguistic diversity and thinking mechanisms on linguistic meanings differ? To this end, what does successful visual teaching moment look like? And how can this visual teaching moment serve a larger purpose to advance the scholarship of teaching and learning?

  • Keywords: Bilingualism, Visual Language, Linguistic Diversity.
  • Mentor Group: Kathy Flecky
  • Scholar Session 4: Saturday, 6/2, 2:00pm – 3:15pm

Huchting, Karie: Educational Leadership, Loyola Marymount University

Understanding the Classroom, Relational, and Pedagogical Practices that Increase Confidence and Knowledge

For the past two years I have involved students in an assessment project where I quantitatively measured their confidence and knowledge prior to the course, discussed their data to drive curricular decisions during the course, and then re-measured confidence and knowledge after the course. In both years, I found a statistically significant increase in both confidence and knowledge. However, for the current work in progress, I seek to understand the central question of why student confidence and knowledge improves. While there may be several explanations for the noted increase, including individual or student-specific factors, my focus will remain on aspects within my control as the professor; that is, the pedagogical practices that deal with the ecology of the classroom. Specifically, I ask the question: what relational, classroom environment, and pedagogical factors contribute to the increase in confidence and knowledge of content?

  • Keywords: Pedagogical Practice, Relational Dynamics, Classroom Ecology, Confidence, Prior Knowledge
  • Mentor Group: Kathleen Perkins
  • Scholar Session 3: 10:30am – 11:45am

Karaali, Gizem: Mathematics, Pomona College

A Humanistic Reading Component in a Transitional Mathematics Course

The main question explored in this project is whether (and if so what) a humanistic reading component could add to a transitional course. I have been using various readings in my transitions courses for the past few years and have anecdotal evidence that it helps retention, and the motivation and enthusiasm levels of the students. I would like to quantify this if at all possible. So far I have used 1. A reading component focused on the nature of mathematical proof in my MATH 101: Introduction to Analysis course, which is a "transition to upper division math" course that emphasizes writing proofs (basically, it is a writing workshop, math-department style); and 2. A reading component focused on the "unreasonable effectiveness of mathematics" in the real world in my MATH 60: Linear Algebra course, which is a lower division course that introduces students to language and techniques of abstract mathematical thinking.

  • Keywords: Mathematics, Reading, Affect, Motivation, Retention
  • Mentor Group: David Reichard
  • Scholar Session 3: 10:30am – 11:45am

Kelsey, Greg: Mathematics, Immaculata University

Calculus in the Disciplines

I plan to study how well my calculus classes prepare students for their future work in the natural and social sciences. Science faculty will assess students' understanding of calculus in the context of their chosen discipline, and I will also collect data from interviews of students and faculty about the perception of students' understanding of calculus after taking the courses.

  • Keywords: Calculus, Transfer, Assessment, Interdisciplinarity.
  • Mentor Group: Curt Bennett
  • Scholar Session 3: Saturday, 6/2, 10:30am – 11:45am

Kim, Eric: Social Science, Lane Community College

Estimating Your Exam Score: Improving Metacognitive Abilities

Students often expect to do well on their exams and surprised when they do not. After completing their exam, students were asked to estimate their score. Data from 4 different psychology courses at two schools across four academic years (n=1,190) were analyzed in nine groups based on course, school and term to see if students' exam average is correlated with their average error in the estimate of their performance. Correlations ranged from r = -.61 to -.75. These results are consistent with Kruger and Dunning (1999) where those with the lowest performance had the worst estimation of their performance, and often overestimated their performance. It was also observed that content affected metacognitive abilities. As the exam average dropped for a difficult topic, the average error in estimating their score increased. Future directions to improve student performance may need to focus in helping students develop their metacognitive skills.

  • Keywords: Metacognition, Exam Improvement
  • Mentor Group: Pat Coward
  • Scholar Session 21: Friday, 6/1, 2:45pm – 4:00pm

Kontur, Fred: Physics, US Air Force Academy

Exploring the Use of Homework Journals in Introductory Physics

Developing problem solving skills is a major goal of physics courses, and homework is typically the most direct and in-depth way for students to practice their problem solving skills. To assess the effectiveness of homework in our introductory physics courses, we measured the correlation between examinations and the different types of assignments – laboratories, homework, pre-class work, and quizzes – that are employed in the courses. Consistently, homework had the lowest correlation to exam success of all the assignment types. In order to address this issue, we have eliminated online homework from our introductory physics courses. Instead, students write out their homework solutions in a bound journal that contains pre-class work, homework, and learning objectives for each lesson. We hope that, with a comprehensive journal, students will be more likely to make connections between learning activities and learning objectives and, ultimately, develop deeper conceptual understanding.

  • Keywords: Homework, Physics, Introductory Physics, Problem Solving, Conceptual Learning.
  • Mentor Group: Jackie Dewar
  • Scholar Session 3: Saturday, 6/2, 10:30am – 11:45am.

Maguire, Cynthia: Chemistry & Biochemistry, Texas Woman's University

Translating Science into Common Language: SENCER and the Dual Poster Project

Many scientists do important work that could have a profound impact on their own field as well as others, but then have difficulty communicating their results. Each discipline, and specialty within it, has jargon that is often not understood by the general public or others in complementary lines of work. By learning to reduce jargon and describe highly complex scientific studies in a manner that most people can understand, researchers will be better able to convey information and collaborate across disciplines. Building on an idea first presented at a SENCER conference (www.sencer.net), we have developed a process whereby students create a public version of their technical research posters. Three students participated in a successful pilot study. Now we are pursuing applications and ways to measure the benefits of this idea for both individuals and institutions. What is it possible to measure? What measurement would be BEST?

  • Keywords: Science communication, Jargon, Dual poster.
  • Mentor Group: David Reichard
  • Scholar Session 4: Saturday, 6/2, 2:00pm – 3:15pm.

Murphy, Lisa: Psychology, York County Community College

The Effects of Classroom Climate on Student Learning

I am interested in studying the factors that are involved in creating a class atmosphere that is conducive to learning. Specifically, I would like to examine the factors that create a classroom climate where the students enjoy one another's company, have an academic support system, and enjoy academic friendships. I am especially interested in the link between student learning, enjoyment of learning, and student friendships in the classroom.

  • Keywords: Academic Friendships, Classroom Climate, Sense of Community.
  • Mentor Group: Pat Coward
  • Scholar Session 4: Saturday, 6/2, 2:00pm – 3:15pm

Pajka, Sharon: English, Gallaudet University

Creating "Place" in a Visually-Oriented and Linguistically-Diverse First-Year Course

How does place--the creation of a safe learning environment that has meaning both in the classroom and in an online setting--illuminate the relationship between the emotional and epistemological dimensions of learning and cultural critique? There are several studies which show that the classroom climate has implications for student-learning. While a negative climate can impede learning and performance, a positive one can energize student- learning. (Ambrose et al. 2010). To explicitly understand the connectedness (spirit, trust, interdependence), and learning (shared educational goals and expectations satisfied through interaction) that occurs in a visually-oriented and linguistically-diverse Critical Reading and Writing course, the researcher explores student community membership and connections to and between academic blogs and classroom sessions. She taped sessions in which students specifically discuss their academic blogs; she examined the academic blogs; and, she surveyed reflective writing prompts and questionnaires about their experiences with community and learning in the course.

  • Keywords: Critical Pedagogy, Affective Learning, Cognitive Learning, Caring.
  • Mentor Group: Jackie Dewar
  • Scholar Session 2: Friday, 6/1, 2:45pm – 4:00pm

Piergiovanni, Polly: Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Lafayette College

Journal Writing in Engineering Courses

Typically, students' grades in an engineering course is based on weekly homework problem sets and exams. Daily writing is not part of most courses. This semester, I have required students to write a few sentences after each class meeting in an online journal. Will summarizing what they have learned in words – instead of equations – increase students' problem solving abilities? As I read the journal entries, I will see the misconceptions, or struggles the students are having with class examples or homework problems. When the semester is over, I will search within the entries for the "aha!" moments when a student grasped the technique I was teaching. If I find that these short writing assignments help students learn difficult concepts more thoroughly, maybe writing should be included more often.

  • Keywords: Journal Writing, Engineering Course, Metacognition.
  • Mentor Group: Jackie Dewar
  • Scholar Session 1: Friday, 6/1, 9:45am – 11:00am

Rankin, Miako: Linguistics, Gallaudet University

Linguistic Diversity as Learning Opportunity

My research investigates how students from diverse language backgrounds support each other in working through learning bottlenecks when teamed on capstone projects. The data, from an introductory linguistics course at Gallaudet University, includes videos of students' capstone project work sessions and the capstone project products. Gallaudet has a bilingual mission designed to serve deaf students, with American Sign Language (ASL) and written English as our academic languages. For the capstone projects, native ASL students work together with relatively recent L2 learners of ASL. Each student brings unique strengths to the analysis processes, and my analysis focuses on evidence of opportunities for each student to personally incorporate the strengths of the other, looking for ways that I can support and enhance their collaboration. Similar strategies and techniques can be readily adapted to other types of diverse student populations and/or technologically and visually-oriented campuses.

  • Keywords: Visual Learning, Capstone, American Sign Language, Group Projects, Student Collaboration.
  • Mentor Group: Julie Lochbaum
  • Scholar Session 1: Friday, 6/1, 9:45am – 11:00am

Selkowitz, Robert: Physics, Canisius College

Developing Scientific Context in Design-Based Lab Environments

This project aims to redevelop the general physics laboratory around active experiment design, closed experimental cycles, and development substantive experimental skills including design, implementation, analysis, and contextualization of experimental work. The current status of the project includes a designed set of lab tasks for the first two semesters of the three semester long sequence, as well as a preliminary assessment mechanism based on Eugenia Etkina's ISLE curriculum. Anecdotal evidence from two semesters utilizing the curriculum suggests that students are showing improved levels of engagement in lab, growing design skills, refined perception of experimental limitations, and a better sense of the context of experiments. The focus of the next phase of the project is proper tuning and deployment of quantitative assessment mechanisms to test student progress in design, analysis and context skills. Long term goals include seamless integration with advanced level laboratory curriculum, and the development of students into scientists.

  • Keywords: Physics, Laboratory, Cycles, Assessment.
  • Mentor Group: Curt Bennett
  • Scholar Session 1: Friday, 6/1, 9:45am – 11:00am

Shoepe, Todd: Health and Human Sciences, Loyola Marymount University

Measuring Learning: Can a Novel, Experiential Class Project based on Pink's Motivational Attributes Improve Student Learning?

Undergraduate students in the fields of pre-medicine and pre-allied health are assessed primarily via standardized testing. While this serves the purpose of legitimate preparation for criterion-referenced exams necessary for professional licensure, exclusive assessment based on examinations at least in part replaces the possibility for self-directed experiential, project based learning. To promote student self-discovery in anatomy and physiology, a semester-long individualized, experiential, learning project has been created. At present, empirical data is lacking as to the efficacy of this project. The purpose is to solicit guidance from experienced scholars of teaching and learning to: 1) identify (or create) appropriate assessment measures to evaluate the effectiveness and the continuance of this project, 2) provide insight as to the evolution of project logistics and objectives in order to maximize learning, and 3) provide evidence as to the efficacy of these projects to the scientific community of teaching and learning.

  • Keywords: Project-Based Learning, Communities of Practice, Experiential Learning, Science Education
  • Mentor Group: Julie Lochbaum
  • Scholar Session 4: Saturday, 6/2, 2:00pm – 3:15pm

Siniawski, Matt: Mechanical Engineering, Loyola Marymount University

Making Grades Meaningful: Standards-Based Grading for Higher Education

The advent of standards-based grading presents an exciting opportunity to potentially transform undergraduate education by actually measuring student learning. Standards-based grading involves directly measuring students' development towards achieving specific course objectives throughout a course, rather than measuring their one-time performance on individual course assignments. This is achieved through the use of a standards-achievement report to track and provide feedback regarding individual student learning and development. Final course grades are then determined based on students' overall development towards achieving the course objectives. Although standards-based grading has gained popularity at the K-12 level, there have been very limited studies to date that involve implementation of standards-based grading at the undergraduate level.

  • Keywords: Grading, Assessment, Student Learning.
  • Mentor Group: David Reichard
  • Scholar Session 2: Friday, 6/1, 2:45pm – 4:00pm

Smythe, Kathleen: History, Xavier University

Experiential Learning for Courage and Engagement in an Era of Crises

Our question is whether practical experiences facilitate students' learning about and engaging demographic, ecological, technological, resource and energy-related challenges. In our teaching, we encourage in students both humility and an energizing wonder about the beauty, complexity, and fragility of our world as well as hope and courage in the face of complex challenges. We require some form of practical experience, political or agricultural, in the belief that experiential learning, alongside intellectual inquiry, makes the historical development and future trajectories of our environmental challenges less daunting. Although we have anecdotal evidence (our students have subsequently sought out both political and environmental internships), we have little data regarding the significance of this practical experience. Our work will contribute to a broader literature on the integration of concepts of sustainability into teaching at tertiary levels and consideration of the emotional and practical needs of students who are graduating into uncertainty.

  • Keywords: Experiential Learning, Sustainability, Environmental Challenges, Courage.
  • Mentor Group: Kathleen Perkins
  • Scholar Session 1: Friday, 6/1, 9:45am – 11:00 am

Taylor, Susan: Mathematics, El Camino College

Intermediate Algebra for Statistics – A New Course at El Camino College

Community college students often start without the preparation needed for college-level mathematics. Students take one to four semesters of developmental mathematics prior to taking college mathematics. Due to the long sequence and poor success rates the percent of students who succeed in getting to a transfer-level mathematics course is only about 5%. A group of instructors at El Camino College is working on two new developmental mathematics courses that will allow students to enter a transfer-level mathematics course more quickly and with better preparation. The second of these is Intermediate Algebra for Statistics. Using descriptive statistics as the primary source of applications, students in this course learn the elementary and intermediate algebra and the mathematical reasoning skills needed for transfer-level statistics. The algebra and basic mathematical literacy will be presented in the context of data-driven applications and motivations based on real-world examples.

  • Keywords: Acceleration, Algebra, Pre-statistics, Developmental Mathematics.
  • Mentor Group: Curt Bennett
  • Scholar Session 2: Friday, 6/1, 2:45pm – 4:00pm

Thompson, Carla: Research and Advanced Studies, University of West Florida

Infusing Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) into Graduate Teaching and Learning in a Masters-Intensive Regional University: Sustaining the Environment

Rapid increases in reported research misconduct occurrences across university campuses have prompted actions by the U. S. Office of Research Integrity. The University of West Florida, an affiliate institution of the Council of Graduate Schools Project for Scholarly Integrity, initiated a project in 2009 aimed at developing and validating a three-tier model (Focusing, Developing, and Sustaining) for infusing responsible conduct of research (RCR Infusion Project) into graduate teaching and learning. The third phase of the RCR Infusion Model, Tier III: Sustaining, slated for full implementation in 2012, is saddled with unclear direction and not fully developed. This session will seek guidance for answering: What key ecological sustainable strategies will eliminate barriers, advance research and scholarly integrity, and enhance the effective infusion of Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) principles across teaching and learning environments for the purpose of increasing the quality of graduate education in regional masters-intensive institutions of higher education?

  • Keywords: Responsible Conduct of Research, Scholarly Integrity, Research Integrity, Graduate Degree Programs, Regional Masters-Intensive University.
  • Mentor Group: Julie Lochbaum
  • Scholar Session 3: Saturday, 6/2, 10:30am – 11:45am

Vierling-Claasen, Angela: Mathematics, Lesley University

Memory-work: Students Researching and Impacting Mathematical Identity

In this project, I will be simultaneously exploring two research questions. First, what can be learned about emotions, relationships, and identities in mathematics by having a group of students do qualitative research on their own mathematical memories (Ingleton & O'Regan 2002, Lapadat et al 2002)? My method for examining this question will be to convene a group of students to engage in a collaborative qualitative research method called "memory-work" (Onyx & Small 2001). This process leads naturally to my second question: Can involving students in research about mathematical memories and identity impact their own mathematical identities and attitudes (Webber 1998)?

  • Keywords: Mathematics, Qualitative Methods, Affect, Identity.
  • Mentor Group: David Reichard
  • Scholar Session 1: Friday, 6/1, 9:45 – 11:00am

Schedule

 Friday
9:45am - 11:00am
Friday
2:45pm - 4:00pm
Saturday
10:30am - 11:45am
Saturday
2:00pm - 3:15pm
Mentor Group Scholar Session 1 Scholar Session 2 Scholar Session 3 Scholar Session 4
Bennett Developing Scientific Context in Design-Based Lab Environments
(Selkowitz)
Intermediate Algebra for Statistics – A New Course at El Camino College
(Taylor)
Calculus in the Disciplines
(Kelsey)
Using Think Alouds to Remove Bottlenecks in Mathematics
(Bhatia)
Coward Addressing the Academic Motivation of Underachieving Students
(Ecklund)
Estimating Your Exam Score: Improving Metacognitive Abilities
(Kim)
Enhancing Graduate Social Work Students' Capacity to Negotiate Tensions That Arise in the Consideration of Psychopathology
(Feldman)
The Effects of Classroom Climate on Student Learning
(Murphy)
Dewar Journal Writing in Engineering Courses
(Piergiovanni)
Creating "Place" in a Visually-Oriented and Linguistically-Diverse First-Year Course
(Pajka)
Exploring the Use of Homework Journals in Introductory Physics
(Kontur)
Will an Instructional Model Focusing on Why rather than How relieve Math Anxiety and Promote Success in Remedial Math?
(Allevato)
Flecky "Slow Teaching" -- Learning in Person
(Bhavsar)
The Effect of Online Courses on Pre-Service Teacher's Performance in Student Teaching
(Ferguson)
Exploring Graduate Seminars as a Community of Practice
(Domizi)
Visualizing the Criminal Justice System through Bilingualism: English and American Sign Language
(Horejes)
Lochbaum Linguistic Diversity as Learning Opportunity
(Rankin)
Developing an Assessment System
(Hegamin-Younger)
Infusing Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) into Graduate Teaching and Learning in a Masters-Intensive Regional University: Sustaining the Environment
(Thompson)
Measuring Learning: Can a Novel, Experiential Class Project based on Pink's Motivational Attributes Improve Student Learning?
(Shoepe)
Perkins Experiential Learning for Courage and Engagement in an Era of Crises
(Smythe)
Correlation of Student Learning Preferences to their Academic Success
(Grovas)
Understanding the Classroom, Relational, and Pedagogical Practices that Increase Confidence and Knowledge
(Huchting)
Understanding Student Characteristics, Student Performance, Instructor, and Classroom Differences Between Honors and Non-Honors Courses
(Hertel)
Reichard Memory-work: Students Researching and Impacting Mathematical Identity
(Vierling-Claassen)
Making Grades Meaningful: Standards-Based Grading for Higher Education
(Siniawski)
A Humanistic Reading Component in a Transitional Mathematics Course
(Karaali)
Translating Science into Common Language: SENCER and the Dual Poster Project
(Maguire)