Helpful Hints for Writing Your Student Learning Outcomes

Helpful Hints for Writing Your Student Learning Outcomes

  • Work with a small group of two or three faculty members to draft your program’s student learning outcomes. Having multiple perspectives during this process is helpful. Each faculty member may have unique ideas about what the outcomes for students should be. Working in a group allows for conversations and consensus about what students should achieve.
  • Once you’ve drafted a set of learning outcomes, ask other faculty in your program to review the content. Faculty can provide feedback on whether they feel the curriculum prepares students to achieve the list of outcomes you’ve generated and if they feel any essential learning is missing from the list.
  • Before you finalize your learning outcomes, be sure to check that you have phrased your outcomes clearly. Ask your students, faculty from other disciplines, and the Office of Assessment for feedback.
  • There is no correct number of student learning outcomes for a program. Some programs have as few as five student learning outcomes; others have a much greater number. The key is to have a set of outcomes that reflects the essential knowledge, skills, and values you have determined are essential for graduates of your program.


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