2017-2018 Events

For details about events, including abstract, bios, links to handouts, recordings, and other material, follow the links below. Event information gets updated on a regular basis. Please contact us at teachers@lmu.edu with any questions or suggestions.

 

  • 3.14.18 - Focusing on LMU’s Undergraduate Learning Outcomes: Information Literacy and Written Communication

    Please join us as we share what we learned from LMU seniors about their Information Literacy and Written Communication skills, talk about how we teach these skills and discuss ways to improve performance.

    We will also share LMU student responses to the 2017 National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) and a summary of the ways that faculty and staff made use of the Teamwork Skills and Leadership Skills evidence that was shared last semester.

    Wednesday, March 14 at 4:00pm 

    Center for Teaching Excellence, UHALL 3030

    Please RSVP to assessment@lmu.edu or x82628.

  • 3.13.18 - Open Classroom Program Discussion

    Please consider visiting the CTE (UHall 3030) Tuesday anytime between 12:30 am & 2:00 pm to celebrate open classrooms this semester.  It is a wonderful opportunity to mingle with colleagues who share your interest in open classrooms and to discuss what we can expect to learn from visits to colleagues’ classes.  Lunch will be provided.

    Tuesday, March 13 between 12:30 am & 2:00 pm 

    Center for Teaching Excellence, UHALL 3030

  • 3.12.18 - Patricia Walsh Teaching Grant Reception

    Course Development Grant Reception, Mon., March 12th between 3 & 5 pm

    Stop by for food and drink and to learn from the CTE Director and other past recipients of Patricia Walsh Teaching Grants how these grants affected their teaching.

    Monday, March 12 between 3:00-5:00 pm 

    Center for Teaching Excellence, UHALL 3030

     

  • 2.20.18- Teaching Yoga and Breathing Techniques for Speech Anxiety

    This workshop will address the common patterns that result from speech anxiety and explain why they occur. We will then practice gentle alignment and breath based movement exercises to remedy these habits. These techniques can be taught to students in preparation for speech assignments and presentations. No yoga clothes, mats or props will be needed.

     

    This workshop is helpful for all instructors teaching Rhetorical Arts, First Year Seminar, and any course with an Oral Flag.

     

    Evan Marsh has been practicing and teaching yoga for over a decade. He was first introduced to yoga through his career in dance. He received his B.A. in Dance from Loyola Marymount University in 2008, and shortly after began teaching yoga in his hometown of Berkeley California. Working with such a diverse community set the tone for his journey as a teacher and has enabled him to adapt to the varying needs of the individual. He is currently teaching Yoga for Dancers at Loyola Marymount University while developing a Wellness & Education Program for Athletes.  

     

    Tuesday, February 20th from 11:30-12:45 pm 

    Center for Teaching Excellence, UHALL 3030

     

    Please RSVP to Coredirector@lmu.edu by 2/15/18

     

     

  • 1.31.18 - Overcoming Communication Anxiety Through Proper Speech Organization

    OVERCOMING COMMUNICATION ANXIETY THROUGH PROPER SPEECH ORGANIZATION

    Abstract:  This workshop is designed to introduce Rhetorical Arts instructors to the fundamentals of speech organization and how proper speech structure is the key to overcoming communication apprehension. Whether you call it speech anxiety or communication apprehension a majority of your students experience a genuine fear of public speaking.  This fear can manifest into physical reactions such as sweating and stuttering. Students can forget what they are going to say and feel unprepared.  However, Communication apprehension can be alleviated by proper speech organization and taking the appropriate preparation steps that enable students to experience and deliver effective speeches.  This workshop is designed to be a practical lesson plan that instructors can incorporate into their own courses.  We will start by having a discussion about speech anxiety and how students can overcome it. This will be followed by an extensive introduction to speech structure and proper outlining as well as access to a speech structural template that can be used in any speaking situation.

    This workshop is helpful for all instructors teaching Rhetorical Arts, First Year Seminar, and any course with an Oral Flag.

    Bio:  Dr. James C. Bunker is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication Studies. He earned his B.A at the University of San Diego, his M.A. at San Jose State University, and completed his doctorate degree at the University of Utah while simultaneously obtaining a Graduate Certificate in Conflict Resolution.  Dr. Bunker taught his first speech class over 20 years ago and has experience as both a professional presenter as well as training faculty on how they can integrate rhetoric, argumentation, speech, and writing into their curriculum. He currently teaches courses in argumentation, rhetorical theory, political communication, communication theory, and civic engagement. He also has experience teaching business communication, interviewing, and small group decision-making. He is also a trained writing instructor having taught courses at the introductory, intermediate, and advanced levels and he currently teaches the Rhetorical Arts and the First Year Seminar courses in LMU’s core curriculum. 

    Wednesday, January 31, 2018
    11:30am - 12:30pm
    Center for Teaching Excellence, UH 3030

    To reserve your space please RSVP to Coredirector@lmu.edu

    This event is organized by Janelle DolRayne in Academic Affairs and hosted by the CTE.

    Your RSVP is an indication of your willingness to be included in the filming of this event.
  • 1.29.18 - How Should We Evaluate Teaching?

    How Should We Evaluate Teaching? Evaluating teaching in a way that everyone perceives as fair is challenging. A panel of experienced LMU professors who have studied the literature on evaluation of teaching will describe some of the methods that are most commonly used and their limitations. Recent research on student evaluations of teaching (SETs) will be discussed. Results of a recent survey of LMU faculty on SETs and their use at LMU will also be presented. All those who attend are encouraged to participate in an open discussion of this important matter.

    Panel:
    Suzanne Larson, Mathematics
    Susie McDaniel, Communication
    Vince Coletta, CTE director and Physics

    Monday, January 29, 2018
    12:30pm - 1:30pm
    Center for Teaching Excellence, UH 3030 

    To reserve your space please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu. Lunch will be provided.

    Your RSVP is an indication of your willingness to be included in the filming of this event. 

     

  • 1.6.18 - Part Time Faculty Orientation

    Part Time Faculty Orientation

    During the Part‐Time Faculty orientation, we will be covering topics such as
    • Getting Ready for Class
    • LMU’s Students
    • Academic Rules and Procedures at LMU – Syllabus, Grading, Academic Honesty, Course Evaluations, and more. 
    • FERPA, What, Why, and How – Federal Law: Record Privacy and Security, PROWL
    • Learning Management System – Communication, Collaboration, Document Sharing, Assessment, and more.
    • Teaching and Student Learning
    During your break you will have the opportunity to meet representatives from several LMU offices that can support you in your teaching, such as (requested):      
    • Academic Resource Center
    • Center for Service and Action
    • Disability Support Services
    • First Year Experience
    • Hannon Library
    • Human Resources
    • Information Technology Services
    • LMU Bookstore
    • Mission and Ministry
    • Office of International Students and Scholars
    • Parking
    • Public Safety
    • Registrar
    • Student Psychological Services

    Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

    Program to start at 9am and go until 4pm. Lunch and refreshments will be provided.
  • 12.7.17 - Supporting First-Generation Students at LMU

    The First To Go program at Loyola Marymount University offers academic, professional and personal support to first-generation college students(FGCS). An overview of the program will show how we specifically serve and support this underrepresented group in higher education. Trends in the first-gen experience will be explored.

    Additionally, research and conversations are shadowed by a deficit perspective and often fail to recognize the resilience, dedication, determination and commitment first-generation students bring to enrich a college campus. These qualities contribute to their success, despite the barriers they are up against. The research presented will explore the internal and external sources of strengths that FGCS utilize to succeed in higher education. Theoretical and practical implications and suggestions of best practices will be discussed to help faculty understand how they can support this population in the classroom and in their daily interactions.

    Thursday, December 7, 2017
    11:30am - 12:30pm
    Center for Teaching Excellence, UH 3030

    To reserve your space please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu. Lunch will be provided.

    This event is directed by the Academic Resource Center and hosted by the CTE.

    Your RSVP is an indication of your willingness to be included in the filming of this event.
  • 12.5.17 - Breathing and Writing: Contemplative Exercises

    Breathing and Writing: Contemplative Exercises

    Jeremy Wasser: “Mechanics of Breathing: What Meditators Should Know.”  This experiential talk engages the audience in how we breathe daily as well as during directed meditations. He uses various “respiratory maneuvers” to demonstrate breathing basics and complexities.

    Candice Kelsey: "Writing Apnea: Do You Suffer from It?" that dovetails Dr. Wasser’s talk. She brings awareness to our habits of breath as we engage in both academic and creative writing.

    DR. JEREMY WASSER is an Associate Professor with appointments in the Veterinary Medical and Medical Schools at Texas A&M University.  He is familiar with LMU through guest presentations over the past few years to faculty and especially students in the Department of Art and Art History and in the SFTV Animation Program where he regularly lectures on comparative anatomy and physiology for the ART 310 Drawing Workshop, “Creatures and Features:  The Anatomy of Imagination”. He also is a consulting scholar in the Sciences – leading tours, or giving special topics lectures to LMU students in their spring study abroad semester program in Bonn, Germany (where he also leads programs and teaches biomedical science students and bioengineers from Texas A&M). He has a special interest in contemplative practice and regularly introduces his pre-medical students to practices in alternative healthcare.

    CANDICE KELSEY's poems have appeared in such journals as Poet Lore, The Cortland Review, Hobart Pulp, and Wilderness House among others – also, her pieces have been incorporated into multiple 3-D art installations. Candice’s work made it to the quarter final stage of the 2017 Able Muse Prize for Poetry and was deemed a finalist for the 2016 Rebecca Lard Award. She has been accepted into the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference and the Virginia Quarterly Review's Writer's Conference. A high-school English teacher of 19 years' standing, Candice published a trade paperback non-fiction study of social networking and adolescent identity formation in 2007, two years after co-founding a private Christian high school in Santa Monica. She scores writing projects for the U.S. Department of Education and serves as a fiction reader for The New England Review.  She is a certified yin and barre instructor, but is most contemplative while listening to opera. Candice is currently a writing instructor at her Alma mater, Loyola Marymount University.

    Tuesday, December 5, 2017
    11:30am - 12:30pm
    Center for Teaching Excellence, UH 3030

    To reserve your space please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu. Lunch will be provided.

    This event is hosted by the CTE and 2017-18 Faculty Associate, Professor Paul Harris.

    Your RSVP is an indication of your willingness to be included in the filming of this event.
  • 11.29.17 - How Should We Evaluate Teaching?

    How Should We Evaluate Teaching? Evaluating teaching in a way that everyone perceives as fair is challenging. A panel of experienced LMU professors who have studied the literature on evaluation of teaching will describe some of the methods that are most commonly used and their limitations. Recent research on student evaluations of teaching (SETs) will be discussed. Results of a recent survey of LMU faculty on SETs and their use at LMU will also be presented. All those who attend are encouraged to participate in an open discussion of this important matter.

    Panel:
    Suzanne Larson, Mathematics
    Susie McDaniel, Communication
    Vince Coletta, CTE director and Physics

    Wednesday, November 29, 2017
    11:30am - 12:30pm
    Life Sciences Building Auditorium 

    To reserve your space please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu. Lunch will be provided.

    Your RSVP is an indication of your willingness to be included in the filming of this event. 

     

  • 11.29.17 - Getting it Done: A Faculty Panel on Program Assessment

    Assessment helps us to do our best work as faculty. Through it we improve our teaching, our curriculum, student advising and more.

    In Getting it Done, a panel of three faculty who help to lead assessment in their programs will share their experiences and best advice. Following the panel, attendees will be engaged in discussion of what’s working and ideas for improving assessment processes in their own programs.

     The faculty panel includes:

    • Nicole Bouvier-Brown from Environmental Science and Chemistry
    • Suzanne Larson from Mathematics
    • Juan Mah y Busch from Chicana/o and Latina/o Studies

    Please join us for wine and cheese and conversation on Wednesday, November 29 at 4pm in the CTE!

    Please RSVP to assessment@lmu.edu.

     

    Wednesday, November 29, 2017
    4:00pm – 5:00pm
    Center for Teaching Excellence, UH 3000

    This workshop is directed by the LMU Office of Assessments and hosted by the CTE.
    Your RSVP is an indication of your willingness to be included in the filming of this event.

     

  • 11.27.17 - Contemplative Studies Curriculum Development

    This session explores curriculum development in contemplative studies at several levels, from specific topics and course syllabi to the potential for developing an interdisciplinary PhD program in contemplative studies at LMU.

    Context: In September 2017, teachers and scholars from over twenty colleges and universities in the U.S. and Canada convened for a “Think Tank on Contemplative Studies,” sponsored by the Mind and Life Institute and hosted by Brown University. In addition to Brown, colleges and universities represented included CUNY (Brooklyn), Loyola Marymount University, Naropa University, Pennsylvania State (West Chester), Smith College, Saint Lawrence University, Texas Christian University, University of Michigan, University of San Diego, University of Southern California, University of Virginia, and Vassar College. Faculty from among these institutions presented papers and shared syllabi as evidence of an increasingly wider presence of Contemplative studies in undergraduate education.

    We will present an overview of selected syllabi from the Brown meeting in an effort to (1) encourage continuing dialog among faculty at LMU who already include aspects of contemplative pedagogy within their teaching, (2) to open that conversation to wider participation, and (3) explore a model through which undergraduate courses in contemplative studies have been implemented at Texas Christian University.
    The session will conclude with an open-ended, free flowing conversation exploring how a PhD program might be crafted from our existing curricular and faculty strengths.

    Facilitators: Paul Harris (CTE Faculty Associate, Professor of English), Chris Chapple (Professor of Theology) and Paul Humphreys (Professor of Music) 

    Monday, November 27, 2017
    11:30am - 12:30pm
    Center for Teaching Excellence, UH 3030

    To reserve your space please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu. Lunch will be provided.

    This event is hosted by the CTE and 2017-18 Faculty Associate, Professor Paul Harris.

    Your RSVP is an indication of your willingness to be included in the filming of this event.
  • 11.16.17 - Academic Honest Workshop

    The Core is hosting an Academic Honesty Workshop on Thursday, November 16th from 11:30am to 12:30pm in the Center for Teaching Excellence (CTE, UHall 3000). The workshop will discuss the LMU University Plagiarism Policy in depth and explore methods for avoiding plagiarism in the classroom. Lunch will be provided.

    Please RSVP to CoreDirector@lmu.edu by Tuesday, November 7th. If you have any food restrictions, please let us know.

    Thursday, November 16, 2017
    11:30am - 12:30pm
    Center for Teaching Excellence, UH 3030

    Your RSVP is an indication of your willingness to be included in the filming of this event. 

     

  • 11.13.17 - Enhancing Reflection Through Peer Feedback

    This talk focuses on Peer-Assisted Reflection (PAR), a set of techniques for promoting individual reflection through peer feedback. Daneil Reinholz of San Diego State University will discuss the use of PAR in three contexts: (1) problem solving across the STEM disciplines, (2) mathematical proof and argumentation, and (3) peer observations between GTAs. In each context, students engaged in constructive critique as a way to support their own learning and the learning of their peers. Daniel Reinholz will focus on both research results and the pragmatics of effectively implementing these techniques.

    Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu. Lunch will be provided. 

    Monday, November 13, 2017
    11:30am - 12:30pm
    Center for Teaching Excellence, UH 3000

    This workshop is co-sponsored by the Collaborative Research on Evaluating, Advancing, and Transforming Education in STEM and the CTE. 

    Your RSVP is an indication of your willingness to be included in the filming of this event. 

     

  • 11.9.17 - Technology Enhanced Learning Speaker Series: John Devoy

    Technology Enhanced Learning Speaker Series Presents JOHN DEVOY: "Recruitment Strategy for Online Programs." 

    As more higher education institutions expand their fully online and hybrid programs offerings, competition increases and so does the cost of recruitment. This series will discuss observations, learnings and best practices for using digital marketing channels to support online and hybrid recruitment. Your brand and website are key components of online/hybrid recruitment strategy. How do you provide exceptional prospective student user experience to realize growth in new students? Attend this speaker series and you will find out. 

    John Devoy, AVP Digital Strategy and Enrollment at The University of San Francisco, has over 12 years of digital strategy experience for student recruitment. John was one of the initial team members of ASU Online at EdPlus, Arizona State University's online programs division. During his tenure of 9 years with ASU, John led website strategy, user experience, web analytics and search engine optimization for the organization. ASU Online realized growth of more than 20,000 fully online students during that time frame. John was hired by USF to oversee digital strategy for USF's online programs and provides strategy for recruiting new online, hybrid and ground students within Strategic Enrollment Management at USF. 

    Please RSVP to Taylor.Nornes@lmu.edu.

    Thursday, November 9, 2017
    12:30 - 1:30pm
    Center for Teaching Excellence, UH 3030

    This workshop is directed by the LMU Office for Technology Enhanced Learning and hosted by the CTE.

    This program will be video and audio taped and may be podcast. By your willing participation in the program, you expressly and irrevocably consent to be photographed, videotaped and/or audio taped and quoted/cited. The films, tapes, and other digital recordings will become the property of the Technology Enhanced Learning, LMU. 

  • 11.3.17 - How Should We Evaluate Teaching?

    How Should We Evaluate Teaching? Evaluating teaching in a way that everyone perceives as fair is challenging. A panel of experienced LMU professors who have studied the literature on evaluation of teaching will describe some of the methods that are most commonly used and their limitations. Recent research on student evaluations of teaching (SETs) will be discussed. Results of a recent survey of LMU faculty on SETs and their use at LMU will also be presented. All those who attend are encouraged to participate in an open discussion of this important matter.

    Panel:
    Suzanne Larson, Mathematics
    Susie McDaniel, Communication
    Vandana Thadani, Psychology
    Vince Coletta, CTE director and Physics

    Friday, November 3, 2017
    11:30am - 12:30pm
    Center for Teaching Excellence, UH 3030

    To reserve your space please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu. Lunch will be provided.

    Your RSVP is an indication of your willingness to be included in the filming of this event. 

     

  • 10.20.17 - Open Classroom Launch

    The LMU Center for Teaching Excellence has for years encouraged faculty to share pedagogical ideas by opening classrooms to others during an Open Classroom Week.  This year Vince Coletta, CTE director, is extending the Open Classroom Program to an ongoing, year-round program.  Many of the faculty have valuable ideas about teaching that they would like to share with colleagues. Please consider opening your classroom this semester on dates of your choosing, under whatever conditions you choose – typically, advance notice of a visit.

    Please consider visiting the CTE for an open discussion of what we can expect to learn from visits to colleagues' classrooms. 

    Snacks will be provided. 

    Friday, October 20, 2017
    11:30am - 1:00pm
    Center for Teaching Excellence, UH 3000

  • 10.18.17 - Unleashing the Power of Rubrics

    Unleashing the Power of Rubrics is designed to provide a step by step guide for creating rubrics, discuss the benefits and many uses of rubrics, and show you how to use them for assessment of learning outcomes in your program.

    Please RSVP to assessment@lmu.edu.

    Wednesday, October 18, 2017
    4:00pm – 5:00pm
    Center for Teaching Excellence, UH 3000

    This workshop is directed by the LMU Office of Assessments and hosted by the CTE. 

  • 10.16.17 - Open Classroom Launch

    The LMU Center for Teaching Excellence has for years encouraged faculty to share pedagogical ideas by opening classrooms to others during an Open Classroom Week.  This year Vince Coletta, CTE director, is extending the Open Classroom Program to an ongoing, year-round program.  Many of the faculty have valuable ideas about teaching that they would like to share with colleagues. Please consider opening your classroom this semester on dates of your choosing, under whatever conditions you choose – typically, advance notice of a visit.

    Please consider visiting the CTE for an open discussion of what we can expect to learn from visits to colleagues' classrooms. 

    Refreshments will be provided - wine and cheese. 

    Monday, October 16, 2017
    4:00pm – 5:30pm
    Center for Teaching Excellence, UH 3000

  • 10.11.17 - Chinese Wisdom Texts as a Window on Contemplative Pedagogy

    Writer, scholar, and translator Bill Porter will engage in a conversation with LMU faculty about intersections between Chinese philosophical and literary traditions and contemporary pedagogy and mindfulness in the classroom. LMU faculty are encouraged to contribute their perspectives and experience with contemplative pedagogy to the conversation; this is the first in a series of events on slow time and contemplative pedagogy at CTE. Lunch will be provided.

    Bill Porter translates under the pen-name Red Pine(Chinese: 赤松; pinyin Chì Song). He specializes in Sanskrit and Chinese texts, primarily Taoist and Buddhist, including poetry and sutras. He has lived and done monastic practice in Taiwan, travelled extensively in mainland China and currently lives in Port Townsend, WA. His translations include a new rendering Laozi's Tao Te Ching , the Lankavatara Sutra, and The Mountain Poems of Stonehouse.

    He is also the author of Road to Heaven: The Chinese Hermit Tradition, a book that recounts his search for and conversations with contemplatives who chose to live in the remote seclusion of the mountains of Southern China. (He tells the story of one individual, a recluse of some fifty years, who did not recognize the name of Mao Tse Tung.)

    Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu and let us know if you have any dietary restrictions.

    Wednesday, October 11, 2017
    12:00pm - 1:00pm
    Center for Teaching Excellence, UH 3000

    This event is hosted by the CTE and 2017-18 Faculty Associate, Professor Paul Harris.

  • 10.4.17 - Facilitators and Barriers to Interdisciplinary Scholarly Collaboration

    LMU’s Center for Teaching Excellence is sponsoring a visit by Juliana Fuqua, a nationally recognized expert on interdisciplinary collaboration.

    To be assured of seating please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu. Please know that your RSVP is an indication of your willingness to be included in the filming of this event.

    Wednesday, October 4, 2017
    4:00 – 5:00 PM Prof. Fuqua’s Talk
    5:00 – 5:30 PM Reception
    Center for Teaching Excellence, UH 3030

    Professor Fuqua’s Talk:
    Facilitators and Barriers to Interdisciplinary Scholarly Collaboration

    Have you worked on a team, group, or network and found it did not go as well as you hoped? In this session I will discuss some factors (not an exhaustive list of factors) that facilitate and impede group processes and outcomes from the perspective of research findings on interdisciplinary scholarly collaboration, the science of team science, social psychology, and health sciences. Intrapersonal, interpersonal, organizational, environmental, and institutional circumstances can hinder or facilitate effective group work as well as cross-disciplinary thinking and innovations. We will discuss some past findings. Professors, administrators, and staff are particularly welcome if they are interested in learning of factors that may help them re-think how well their past collaboration went, current collaboration is going, or future collaboration will go, particularly across disciplinary boundaries.

    Juliana Fuqua, Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology and Sociology at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, completed her doctoral thesis at UC Irvine, where she conducted an evaluation of several transdisciplinary scientific collaborations. She has published in multiple journals, including the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, and she has given invited talks at conferences and meetings of principal investigators across the country, including the National Academy of Sciences and the National Institutes for Health (National Cancer Institute).

  • 9.27.17 - What Factors Influence LMU Student Persistence and Graduation?

    The Office of Institutional Research and Decision Support (IRDS) conducted two research studies of new freshmen to identify factors related to first-year retention and subsequent graduation. IRDS will present the key findings of these studies, including what was found to be predictive of retention and/or graduation at LMU and recommendations made to the Provost to improve both first-year to sophomore retention and graduation.

    Presenters:
    Christine Chavez, Senior Director of Institutional Research and Decision Support
    Michelle Castellanos, Ph.D., Associate Director of Survey Research
    Susan Burkhauser, Ph.D., Institutional Research & Business Intelligence Associate
    Dr. Jeanne Ortiz, Dean of Students

    Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu. 

    Wednesday, September 27, 2017
    4:00pm – 5:00pm
    Center for Teaching Excellence, UH 3000

  • 9.25.17 - New Faculty Orientation: Follow-up

    CTE director, Vince Coletta, presents for the NFO Follow-up series on "Teaching Strategies."

    Monday, September 25, 2017
    4:00pm – 5:00pm
    Center for Teaching Excellence, UH 3000

  • 9.6.17 - Student Meet and Greet with Prof. Wieman

    Physics students from CTE director, Vince Coletta's class meet with Professor Wieman.

    Wednesday, August 6, 2017
    1:30pm - 2:30pm
    Center for Teaching Excellence, UH 3000

    Carl Wieman received the Nobel Prize in physics in 2001 for creating an incredible new state of matter, the Bose- Einstein condensate. He was named US Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation in 2004. Carl used his Nobel Prize money to create the popular PHET website, which provides numerous simulations in physics and other fields. In 2007 the U. of British Columbia provided him with five million dollars to transform the teaching practices in their STEM departments. In 2010 he served as Asst. Sec. of Education in the Obama administration. Since 2013 Carl has been at Stanford, where he is a Professor in the Physics Dept. and in the Graduate School of Education. His book Improving How Universities Teach Science was published in May by Harvard Press.

  • 9.6.17 - Faculty Luncheon with Prof. Wieman

    The CTE hosts a luncheon with LMU faculty and guest speaker, Carl Wieman. 

    Wednesday, August 6, 2017
    12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Center for Teaching Excellence, UH 3000

    Carl Wieman received the Nobel Prize in physics in 2001 for creating an incredible new state of matter, the Bose- Einstein condensate.  He was named US Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation in 2004.  Carl used his Nobel Prize money to create the popular PHET website, which provides numerous simulations in physics and other fields. In 2007 the U. of British Columbia provided him with five million dollars to transform the teaching practices in their STEM departments.  In 2010 he served as Asst. Sec. of Education in the Obama administration.  Since 2013 Carl has been at Stanford, where he is a Professor in the Physics Dept. and in the Graduate School of Education. His book Improving How Universities Teach Science was published in May by Harvard Press. 

  • 9.6.17 - Advances in Research on Learning and Teaching

    Nobel Laureate and distinguished educational researcher Carl Wieman will talk to LMU faculty, proposing a new way to evaluate teaching effectiveness. His visit is sponsored by LMU's Center for Teaching Excellence.

    Wednesday, September 6, 2017
    Life Sciences Building Auditorium
    4:00 – 5:30 pm Professor Wieman's Talk & Questions
    5:30 – 6:30 pm Hors d'Oeuvres & Drinks

    Professor Wieman's Talk:
    Advances in Research on Learning and Teaching and Their Relevance to the Evaluation of Teaching

    While there has been enormous progress in the knowledge and research methods in academic disciplines over the past 500 years, the teaching has remained largely medieval. This is starting to change, as there has been great progress in research on teaching and learning in the past few decades. When the insights from this research have been implemented in university classrooms, dramatic improvements in learning have been seen when compared to traditional lecture instruction, particularly on tests that capture how well the student is able to make decisions like an expert in the subject. Although the classroom studies have mostly been carried out in science and engineering, they are based on fundamental cognitive psychology/learning science principles that apply quite generally. This research makes a strong case that the extent of use of effective research-based teaching methods is a much better predictor of student learning and success than other methods for evaluating teaching. I will briefly review these advances in research on teaching and learning, and then discuss practical means to characterize teaching practices used in individual courses, followed by an open discussion.

    Wieman poster pic 1Wieman poster pic 2

     

    Carl Wieman received the Nobel Prize in physics in 2001 for creating an incredible new state of matter, the Bose- Einstein condensate.  He was named US Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation in 2004.  Carl used his Nobel Prize money to create the popular PHET website, which provides numerous simulations in physics and other fields. In 2007 the U. of British Columbia provided him with five million dollars to transform the teaching practices in their STEM departments.  In 2010 he served as Asst. Sec. of Education in the Obama administration.  Since 2013 Carl has been at Stanford, where he is a Professor in the Physics Dept. and in the Graduate School of Education. His book Improving How Universities Teach Science was published in May by Harvard Press. 


    This link is to a very recent interview of Prof. Wieman by NPR on his ideas concerning teaching:
    http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2017/06/07/530909736/hey-higher-ed-why-not-focus-on-teaching

  • 9.1.17 - Faculty Meet & Greet

    Please join the CTE staff in welcoming the new semester with wine and cheese and good company! 

    Friday, September 1, 2017
    4:00pm - 5:00pm
    Center for Teaching Excellence, UH 3000

  • 8.28.17 - Faculty Meet & Greet

    Please join the CTE staff in welcoming the new semester with wine and cheese and good company! 

    Monday, August 28, 2017
    4:00pm - 5:00pm
    Center for Teaching Excellence, UH 3000

  • 8.23.17 - Part Time Faculty Orientation

    Part Time Faculty Orientation

    During the Part‐Time Faculty orientation, we will be covering topics such as
    • Getting Ready for Class
    • LMU’s Students
    • Academic Rules and Procedures at LMU – Syllabus, Grading, Academic Honesty, Course Evaluations, and more. 
    • FERPA, What, Why, and How – Federal Law: Record Privacy and Security, PROWL
    • Learning Management System – Communication, Collaboration, Document Sharing, Assessment, and more.
    • Teaching and Student Learning
    During your break you will have the opportunity to meet representatives from several LMU offices that can support you in your teaching, such as (requested):      
    • Academic Resource Center
    • Center for Service and Action
    • Disability Support Services
    • First Year Experience
    • Hannon Library
    • Human Resources
    • Information Technology Services
    • LMU Bookstore
    • Mission and Ministry
    • Office of International Students and Scholars
    • Parking
    • Public Safety
    • Registrar
    • Student Psychological Services

    Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

    Program to start at 9am and go until 4pm. Lunch and refreshments will be provided.
  • 8.19.17 - Part Time Faculty Orientation

    Part Time Faculty Orientation

    During the Part‐Time Faculty orientation, we will be covering topics such as
    • Getting Ready for Class
    • LMU’s Students
    • Academic Rules and Procedures at LMU – Syllabus, Grading, Academic Honesty, Course Evaluations, and more. 
    • FERPA, What, Why, and How – Federal Law: Record Privacy and Security, PROWL
    • Learning Management System – Communication, Collaboration, Document Sharing, Assessment, and more.
    • Teaching and Student Learning
    During your break you will have the opportunity to meet representatives from several LMU offices that can support you in your teaching, such as (requested):      
    • Academic Resource Center
    • Center for Service and Action
    • Disability Support Services
    • First Year Experience
    • Hannon Library
    • Human Resources
    • Information Technology Services
    • LMU Bookstore
    • Mission and Ministry
    • Office of International Students and Scholars
    • Parking
    • Public Safety
    • Registrar
    • Student Psychological Services

    Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

    Program to start at 9am and go until 4pm. Lunch and refreshments will be provided.
  • 8.17.17 - New Faculty Orientation: Challenges to Teaching

    As a part of LMU's New Full Time Faculty Orientation 2017, CTE director Vince Coletta presented on “Challenges to Teaching.” 

    Thursday, August 17, 2017
    8:30am – 9:15am
    Center for Teaching Excellence, UH 3000

    9:15am - 10:45am the CTE hosted a faculty panel who addressed “Teaching Strategies: How Our Students Learn.”                    

    Faculty Panel:
    Elizabeth Drummond, Associate Professor & Chair, History (Facilitator)
    José García-Moreno, Associate Professor, Animation
    Dorothea Herreiner, Associate Professor, Economics
    Jeremy McCallum, Associate Professor & Chair, Chemistry & Biochemistry

  • 8.11.17 - Part Time Faculty Orientation

    Part Time Faculty Orientation

    During the Part‐Time Faculty orientation, we will be covering topics such as
    • Getting Ready for Class
    • LMU’s Students
    • Academic Rules and Procedures at LMU – Syllabus, Grading, Academic Honesty, Course Evaluations, and more. 
    • FERPA, What, Why, and How – Federal Law: Record Privacy and Security, PROWL
    • Learning Management System – Communication, Collaboration, Document Sharing, Assessment, and more.
    • Teaching and Student Learning
    During your break you will have the opportunity to meet representatives from several LMU offices that can support you in your teaching, such as (requested):      
    • Academic Resource Center
    • Center for Service and Action
    • Disability Support Services
    • First Year Experience
    • Hannon Library
    • Human Resources
    • Information Technology Services
    • LMU Bookstore
    • Mission and Ministry
    • Office of International Students and Scholars
    • Parking
    • Public Safety
    • Registrar
    • Student Psychological Services

    Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

    Program to start at 9am and go until 4pm. Lunch and refreshments will be provided.
  • 5.2.2018- Moving "Beyond Service" for Systemic Social Change

    Please consider attending Moving “Beyond Service” for Systemic Social Change on Wednesday, May 2nd, at 12:30-1:30 pm. This event is presented by CTE Faculty Associate Nina Reich. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu. Lunch will be provided. Please note that your RSVP is also an indication of your willingness to be included in the filming of this event.

     

    Service, in the Jesuit tradition of being “men and women for others,” is no doubt needed in today’s society.  Additionally, while the majority of the literature on community-based learning focuses on service as its telos and dominant learning outcome, this workshop encourages pedagogies for community-based learning that move “beyond service”—and, instead, focus on teachings and assignments that afford students the opportunity to address the root systemic issues of oppression and discrimination that give rise to the need for service in the first place.  Strategies and tactics to address root causes, in this workshop, are highlighted through case studies, student outcomes and community initiatives for just social change.

     

  • 5.1.2018- Matthew Peterson Visits LMU

     

    LMU’s Center for Teaching Excellence sponsors avisit by distinguished educational researcher andcurriculum developer Dr. Matthew Peterson, whowill talk about how the brain’s neural subsystemsrelate to development of pedagogical innovations.

    Dr. Matthew Peterson co-founded MIND Research Institute in 1998. MIND is a neuroscience and education social benefit organization, dedicated to ensuring that all students are mathematically equipped to solve the world’s most challenging problems. Matthew, motivated in part by the challenges he faced in school due to dyslexia, created ST Math, a non-language-based, conceptually driven PreK-8 instructional program that guides every student through a unique path of rigorous learning and problem solving that deeply engages, motivates and challenges students toward higher achievement. ST Math serves more than 1.2 million students in 45 states, creating learning environments that can yield the next generation of STEM leaders. Dr. Peterson earned undergraduate degrees in electrical engineering, biology, and Chinese language and literature from University of California, Irvine. He then completed his Ph.D. degree in visual neuroscience at University of California, Berkeley.


    Dr. Peterson’s Talk
    Experience how neuroscience and game-based approaches are being combined to boost the learning of mathematics and non-routine problem solving. Journey with Dr. Matthew Peterson as he provides a fun hands-on tour of the underlying four neural subsystems theory that forms the basis of MIND Research Institute's unique ST Math program. Recent large-scale studies with over 150,000 students show a double-digit learning advantage on state standardized math assessments. MIND attributes these large and scalable effect


    Life Science Auditorium
    4:00 – 5:00 pm Dr. Peterson’s Talk & Questions
    5:00 – 6:30 pm Reception, Hors d’Oeuvres & Drinks
    To be assured of seating please RSVP early to: teachers@lmu.edu
    Please note that your RSVP is also an indication of your willingness to be included in the filming of this event.

  • 4.24.18- Pedagogies of Community-Based Learning for Just Social Change

    Please consider attending Pedagogies of Community-Based Learning for Just Social Change on Tuesday, April 24th, 12:30-1:30pm. This event is presented by CTE Faculty Associate Nina Reich. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu. Lunch will be provided.

     

    Central to our Jesuit three-fold mission is “the service of faith and the promotion of justice.”  At LMU, although there has been a concerted effort to embody this mission’s tenant through the embodiment of community-based learning (CBL) courses and academic projects, many obstacles still exist in ensuring the successful enactment of such courses.  In order to achieve transformation learning that benefits faculty members, students and community-partners alike, this session affords faculty members tips, strategies and support mechanisms to overcome common CBL pedagogical challenges including, but not limited to:  logistics of community-placements, advocacy with and not for others, volunteerism versus solidarity, community sustainability in lieu of “hour-logging,” and questions of political engagement versus indoctrination.  These meta-level questions will be tangibly addressed through examples such as syllabi construction, class assignments, readings, reflections and assessment. 

     

    To be assured of seating please RSVP early to: teachers@lmu.edu
    Please note that your RSVP is also an indication of your willingness to be included in the filming of this event.