Faculty Panel Descriptions

 

                          Assessment 

 

 

            

Academic Honesty | October 30, 2020: Many of our summer participants expressed concerns over academic honesty during remote instruction. In this panel, we shared ways to teach academic integrity and how to help students live up to those standards. Panelists: Ed Mosteig (Math), Damon Rago (Dance), Arnab Banerji (Theater Arts), and Michael Noltemeyer (Writing Program) Notes at this link.

Assessment | August 11, 2020: We discussed the process of adapting or designing assignments for remote instruction, including best practices for maintaining academic integrity and for managing faculty and learners’ workloads. With Nigel Raab (History) and Michael Noltemeyer (Writing Program). Notes at this link 

Grading Revisited | October 16, 2020: Let’s face it: grading is no one’s favorite part of teaching. We discussed alternative approaches, including un-grading, specifications grading, assessing contributions rather than attendance or participation, and more! Panelists: Elizabeth Drummond (History), Tim Shanahan (Philosophy), and Michael Noltemeyer (Writing Program). Notes at this link 

               Community Building

 

 

           

Attendance and Participation | August 4, 2020: We explored how to encourage attendance synchronously and during self-paced activities, discussing the challenges that arise in assessing attendance and participation and sharing best practices. With Marne Campbell (African American Studies), Rebecca Stephenson (School of Education), and Michael Noltemeyer (Writing Program). Notes at this link 

Collaboration and Group Work | October 02, 2020: Many of our summer series participants advocated for the importance of group work during remote instruction—in this panel, we explored the best ways to facilitate collaboration and student-student interaction. Panelists: Eric Haruki Swanson (Theological Studies), Kristine Kawamura (MGMT), Grace Kao (Theological Studies), and Michael Noltemeyer (Writing Program). Notes at this link 

Communication | August 18, 2020:  We shared best practices for communicating with students, colleagues, and administrators during remote instruction. With Shannon Tabaldo (School of Education, iDEAL Institute), Mairead Sullivan (Women’s and Gender Studies), and Michael Noltemeyer (Writing Program). Notes at this link.  

Community Building | August 07, 2020: We discussed observations of students’ experiences with online instruction as well as best practices for fostering a virtual community that can engage collectively with course content. With Karen Huchting (Educational Leadership), Zachary Zysman (Campus Rabbi, Student Affairs), and Michael Noltemeyer (Writing Program). Notes at this link 

Getting to Know Your Students | September 25, 2020:  We discussed ways that faculty are trying to get to know their students online—what’s working and what isn’t? Panelists: Eric Haruki Swanson (Theological Studies), Julian Saint Clair (CBA), Arnab Banerji (Theater Arts), and Michael Noltemeyer (Writing Program). Notes at this link

Difficult Conversations with Students | February 05, 2021:  Sometimes students need to hear things they don't want to. Somethings things need to be said that we don't know how to say. Come share your best practices for having difficult conversations with students. With Todd Shoepe (health and human sciences), Jordan Freitas (computer science), Barbara Marino (electrical engineering), Emily Fisher (education), and Michael Noltemeyer (Writing Program). Notes at this link

 

                       Innovation

 

 

            

A Dream of Spring | December 04, 2020: While we don’t yet know what the spring semester will look like, we should know by December — whether we’re returning to campus or continuing with remote instruction, we used this session to start making plans, coming together to share the instructional successes and failures of the fall that will inform our teaching in spring 2021. Panelists: Karie Huchting (Education), Deanna Cooke (Psychology), Cheryl Hertz (Biology), and Michael Noltemeyer (Writing Program). Notes at this link 

Tech Tools | August 14, 2020: We talked about the challenges and unexpected benefits of Zoom and other technology tools that faculty are integrating in the classroom. With Mairead Sullivan (Women’s and Gender Studies), Brianne Gilbert (Political Science & Urban and Environmental Studies), and Michael Noltemeyer (Writing Program).  Notes at this link 

             Faculty Development

 

 

            

Research Support | August 21, 2020: Faculty shared strategies that they are using (or avoiding) to continue research.  Topics included support, access, and productivity techniques to sustain research during remote instruction. With Demian Willette (Biology), Brianne Gilbert (Political Science & Urban and Environmental Studies), and Michael Noltemeyer (Writing Program). Notes at this link 

Self-Care | August 25, 2020: Faculty spend a lot of time thinking about how to practice empathy with their students and working hard on their behalf, but also have to remember to sharpen the saw! In this panel, we shared methods for practicing self-care during remote instruction. With Elizabeth Wimberly (Research & Creative Arts), Zachary Zysman (Campus Rabbi, Student Affairs), and Michael Noltemeyer (Writing Program). Notes at this link 

Unexpected Challenges | November 13, 2020: If we’ve learned anything from remote instruction, it’s that the next surprise is always just around the corner. How did we handle the new challenges that arose this semester? In this panel, we shared the ways we’ve adapted as well as the ways we can continue preparing for the unexpected. Panelists: Skinner Myers (Film), Wendy Binder (Biology), and Michael Noltemeyer (Writing Program). Notes at this link

 

Fundamentals of Learning

 

 

            

Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving Across Disciplines | Feburary 19, 2021: Almost every discipline please lipservice to the importance of training critical thinkers and problem solvers – but what does that actually mean? What do we need to do in the classroom? And how do we know whether it’s working? Panelists:Carissa Phillips- Garrett (Philosophy), Mandy Korpusik (Computer science), Barbara Marino (electrical engineering), and Sarah Mitchell (chemistry) Notes at this link