Course Descriptions

  • HNRS 1100 01 Honors Philosophical Inquiry MWF 12:15 1:15 Speak, Dan

    Seen in one way, this course will be a topical introduction to philosophy by way of seminar discussion of a few core philosophical questions— for example, about the existence God, about the limits of our knowledge, and about the freedom of our wills. In this sense, it might be tempting to think of this course (merely) as a kind of general survey of what philosophers think about. If you are somewhat more attentive, however, you will be able to see (though maybe only looking back) that the questions on which we will focus can help you hone in on one of the most fundamental questions of your life; namely, just what kind of thing are YOU? We will be counting on help from Plato, Aquinas, Descartes, and a number of contemporary philosophers to make some initial attempts to answer this question.

    HNRS 1100 02 Honors Philosophical Inquiry TR 8:00 9:30am Rudnick, Kenneth

    The purpose of this course is to explore, examine, and analyze what we mean by the nature of human nature. What is human nature? Do we possess a human nature? Of what is the human composed? Our exploration of these significant questions must take into account a wide and diverse range of intellectual thought and human experience. Such an ambitious task requires a spectrum of reading from the Socratics to more contemporary evolutionary biology. Such an extensive span of human thought reveals that many of the same questions concerning the nature of the person, science, knowledge, freedom, happiness, truth, God, gods, and immortality, seem to recur throughout every age. Of equal importance, the course is designed to provide the necessary background for you to determine, by critical reflection and analysis, your knowledge, understanding, and personal assessment of human nature.

    “Hence, the science of nature is the theoretical part of philosophy, and the science of intelligence its practical part.” — Hegel

    HNRS 1200 01 Honors Theological Inquiry MW 1:45 3:25 Hussain, Amir

    “This course takes a comparative approach to theological inquiry, examining fundamental religious questions in relation to two or three religious traditions (one of them being Christianity). The course emphasizes comparative analysis of primary religious sources and focuses on how diverse religious approaches to questions of ultimate concern might be mutually illuminative. The course also includes interactive encounters with practitioners of the religions under consideration.”

    The above paragraph is description of the course as found in the LMU University Bulletin. The realities of religious diversity cannot be ignored. Increasingly, people live, work, and pray alongside persons of many faith traditions. It is therefore essential to learn how to negotiate this reality: theologically, ethically, and spiritually. This course will introduce honours students to the study of comparative theology. The first part of the course will be an introduction to comparative theology through the Christian tradition. The second part of the course will focus on the Muslim tradition, but will also include examples from the Jewish tradition.

    HNRS 1200 02 Honors Theological Inquiry TR 9:55 11:35 Harris, Kim

    This course introduces students to the meaning and significance of spiritual practice in its distinctively Christian expressions and expressions associated with other traditions. The focus of the course is on “lived religion” – the embodied, eclectic, and often improvisational character of spiritual experience, both collective and individual. It also seeks to understand the critical role of practice in shaping spiritual meaning and identity. In this course, we turn to the relationship between theological ideas and spiritual practices. How have particular people lived in the light of the theological ideas of their religious tradition? How have the spiritual practices of particular persons and groups affected the theological ideas of their religious tradition? Throughout the course, we attend to plurality, social justice, and change.

    HNRS 1200 03 Honors Theological Inquiry TR 9:55 11:35 Harris, Kim

    This course introduces students to the meaning and significance of spiritual beliefs and practices in its distinctively Christian expressions and—to a more limited extent—to expressions associated with other religious traditions. The course adopts a comparative and interdisciplinary approach, teaching across different cultural contexts (e.g., Europe, the Middle East, North Africa, North, Central, and South America), religious traditions (Christianity, Judaism, and Islam), and disciplines (e.g., Religious Studies, Theology, History, Philosophy, and Women’s and Gender Studies). Students will learn about the richness and complexity of the religious traditions as well as the diverse voices that constitute these traditions. The focus of the course is on “lived religion”—the embodied, eclectic and often improvisational character of spiritual experience, both collective and individual. This approach includes considering the central ideas about spiritual meaning and identity (probing the many anthropological facets that make up a human being, e.g., gender, sexuality, class, race, ethnicity, etc.) that shape religious traditions. Students will attend to and learn to interpret ways in which identity and meaning can be construed, whether in explicitly religious terms or, more implicitly, arising from human experience. Through a study of significant Christian and non-Christian spiritual texts, both ancient and modern, students will consider such theological questions as the meaning of “spirituality” and the relationship between religious experience and the development of theological thought and human identity. The course will discuss such ultimate questions as: Who am I and what is my place in the whole scheme of things? What is of ultimate value? What makes for a meaningful life? How can I best make sense of love, suffering, loss, and death?

    HNRS 2000-01, HNRS Colloq: Research & Exhibition, T 6:00 - 7:00 Almstedt, Hawley

    This course, required for all students of the University Honors Program, is an orientation to the practice of research and creative activity from a scholarly point of view. It introduces developing scholars and creative people to the methods, habits, assumptions, and culture of pursuing knowledge. This includes 1) the formulation by the student of a problem worthy of in-depth study, 2) the articulation of how that problem can be addressed, and 3) the public exhibition of the student's work. In short, the course introduces students to formal, mentored academic research and creative work.

    HNRS 2100 01 Honors Hist Analysis & Perspec MW 9:55 11:35 McDonald, Kevin
    HNRS 2100 02 Honors Hist Analysis & Perspec MW 11:50 1:30 McDonald, Kevin

    The events and processes initiated by the voyage of Columbus in 1492 transformed his contemporary world and fundamentally shaped the world we live in today. This course explores the development of American colonies from an Atlantic world perspective, examining the circulation of people, goods, ideas, and even plants and germs, between the Old World of Europe and Africa, and the New World of the Americas, created as a consequence of the Columbian encounter. It focuses on the lived experiences of the men and women who inhabited the Atlantic world from the mid-fifteenth through mid-nineteenth centuries. The Atlantic Ocean itself functioned as frontier, a zone of interaction, and as a powerful connector between profoundly differing cultures. The consequences of the process of cultural conflict and exchange will be a main focus of this course, and the results for Europeans, Africans, and Native Americans were uneven and often tragic. Students will explore varying methods and motivations of colonization, including the search for commodities, and comparative successes and failures. Major themes of the course will include the development of new societies and cultures; comparative colonial systems; imperial competition; Atlantic revolutions; slavery and abolition; and resistance, adaptation, and survival.

    HNRS 2200 01 Hnrs Nature of Sci, Tech, Math TR 11:50 1:30 Zink, Trevor

    A deep dive into environmental management, from the perspectives of science, business, daily life, and ethics. We will explore topics including environmental impact assessment (such as life cycle assessment); sustainable production and consumption (including whether those are, indeed, possible); primary drivers of environmental damage and strategies to mitigate them; Indigenous Knowledges on sustainable ways of living, being, and thinking; ethics of population and affluence; personal sustainability in terms of diet, transportation, and consumption; macro issues such as the future of capitalism, growth, degrowth, and socioeconomic alternatives. We will explore not only how various approaches to environmental management work, but also what they can and cannot tell us.

    Note: MGMT majors can use this course as one of your MGMT electives. You'll just need to let me know that you intend to do this and we will do the appropriate paperwork.

    HNRS 3000 01 HNRS Colloq: Edge What We Know F 2:00 4:00 Zink, Trevor and Dilts, Andrew

    This course seeks to introduce you to the boundaries of knowledge and art within the fields of selected LMU professors…and how they crossed them. The course builds upon the prior Honors Colloquia (HNRS 1000 and 2000) and leads directly to the Honors Thesis (HNRS 5000). This colloquia is built around a series of curated public talks from LMU faculty. Each professor will talk about how and why an area captured their curiosity and interest, building on themes of purpose from Intro to Honors. As you did in Research & Exhibition, the speakers will then proceed to talk about how they identified the “edge” of that area and determined a way to move it forward. In so doing, they contributed to their field and took this “edge” further out for future scholars and creatives—something which we hope that you, too, will accomplish with your Honors Thesis. Your engagement with these professors will be captured in a class-produced podcast season with one episode devoted to each speaker.

    HNRS 3200 01, Honors Literary Analysis, TR 1:45 3:25 Neel, Alex
    HNRS 3200 02, Honors Literary Analysis, TR 3:40 5:20 Neel, Alex

    This course introduces students to different ways of interpreting short stories and novels, including works by Jamaica Kincaid, Margaret Atwood, and Emily Saint John Mandel. We’ll explore the formal and technical aspects of fiction: we’ll discuss point of view, setting, character, plot, tone, and talk about how these aspects of literature affect the meaning and power of particular narratives. In other words, you will learn how to read literature closely and will acquire the technical and critical vocabulary necessary to say what is happening in various genres. Here are some questions we will return to over the course of the semester: How do authors use the resources of literature to engage with the social and political issues of their times? What kind of perspective does literature offer? 

    HNRS 4200 01, Honors Ethics and Justice: Beyond Good and Evil, TR 9:55 11:35 Treanor, Brian
    HNRS 4200 02, Honors Ethics and Justice: Beyond Good and Evil, TR 11:50 1:30 Treanor, Brian

    This iteration of the Honors ‘Beyond Good and Evil’ does not fit neatly into standard academic categories—“philosophy,” “literature,” “history,” and so on. It also defies easy categorization in terms of its topic. We will be thinking about ethics, but without an extended focus on prominent ethical theories like utilitarianism, deontology, and virtue ethics. We will be discussing the literature of nature, but not in terms of theory or literary criticism. We will conduct much of our work around a seminar table; but I hope to keep our thinking close to the actual experience of particular places and to our embodied experience of the world—the sweet tang of wild blackberries, pungent scent of pine forests, the sticky-salt humidity of sea air, the greyscale play of moonlight on desert topography, the psithurism of quaking aspens in the autumn. Perhaps, then, the best way to think of our class is as a humanities-based reflection on the experience of nature and of wildness. Together, we are going to think about nature, human and otherwise, and about wildness; and we are going to think about the presence or absence of both in our own lived experience and in the experience of our contemporaries. Note that this will be a reading and writing intensive class that will require students to work independently, write both clearly and creatively, and engage in seminar discussions. It will not be a paint-by-numbers, check-things-off-the-list, regurgitate-on-the-exam type of class. 

  • HNRS 1100 01 Honors Philosophical Inquiry MW 3:40 5:20 Baehr, Jason

    This course will provide an introduction to philosophy. It will focus on two main topics: reality and knowledge. It will address questions like: What ultimately exists? Only matter? Or do some non-physical things also exist? Are human persons purely physical? Or do they have a non-physical dimension? Is knowledge possible? If so, how? What does it look like to be a "good knower" in the 21st century? In our exploration of these and related questions, we'll read work by both ancient and contemporary philosophers. In addition to providing you with an understanding of several classic philosophical problems and how these problems have been addressed across time, the course is also aimed at helping you develop the skills and dispositions necessary for thinking and learning well. Grades will be based on a combination of exams, papers, quizzes, and other short assignments.

    HNRS 1100 02 Honors Philosophical Inquiry TR 11:50 1:30 Wang, Robin

    This course is designed to introduce students to the various modes of philosophical inquiry and to the great philosophical questions that are relevant to a humanistic education in the Catholic intellectual tradition. More specifically, the aim of this course is to help students to acquire an understanding of fundamental metaphysical (the study of the nature of what is) and epistemological (the study of the nature and scope of human knowledge) questions in ancient philosophical texts from Greek and Daoist traditions. We will read classic texts such as Plato's Dialogues, Epictetus, Lucretius, Daodejing and Zhuangzi. This course will assist students in acquiring the interpretive and evaluative skills necessary for assessing various answers to these fundamental questions, and to encourage them to develop a lifelong habit of philosophical self-reflection.

    HNRS 1100 03 Honors Philosophical Inquiry MW 1:45 3:25 Kramer, Sina

    At the risk of parroting the understatement of the year, these are not normal times. We will tackle big questions, some of which speak to our current moment, such as: what is racism? What is race? How and why do we define the boundaries of the human through the concept of race? What is the meaning of a plague – if indeed, a plague can have meaning? How do we make meaning in the face of mortality? We will also tackle big questions that seem take some distance from our current moment, questions such as: is the soul immortal? What is knowledge, and how is it possible? What is freedom? What is history, and what is it for? What is philosophy? Given the nature of philosophy as a practice, however, we may well find that these questions also speak to our current moment, or help to frame that space from which we can more clearly see our own times. Philosophy is, after all, a practice of sense making: its methods, its concepts, and the discipline it teaches, while born of the tumult of the world, help us to chart a space beyond the world from which to examine and understand it. The urgency of our own moment is met paradoxically with the urgency of philosophy. Now more than ever, we need the tools and the values of philosophy: to read and to write; to listen carefully and generously; to examine closely and to ask deeply; to distinguish sound argument from simple opinion; to imagine, to wonder, to think and to ponder; and to develop a passionate love for the truth and for wisdom.

    HNRS 1200 01 Honors Theological Inquiry MW 1:45 3:25 Swanson, Eric

    The Diverse Voices of American Buddhism

    This course will have students critically examine the development of American Buddhism by focusing on how members of marginalized groups are responding to contemporary issues of race, representation, suffering, and liberation through the lens of the Buddhist teachings. By doing so, students are encouraged to reflect on how the Buddhist teachings continue to be reshaped by its communities of faith while also recognizing and celebrating the diversity of voices that constitute American Buddhism.

    HNRS 1200 02 Honors Theological Inquiry TR 11:20 12:50 Hussain, Amir

    Comparative Theology

    The realities of religious diversity cannot be ignored. Increasingly, people live, work, and pray alongside persons of many faith traditions (including no faith tradition). It is therefore essential to learn how to negotiate this reality: theologically, ethically, and spiritually. This course will introduce honors students to the study of comparative theology. The first part of the course will be an introduction to comparative theology through the Christian tradition. The second part of the course will focus on the Muslim tradition, but will also include examples from the Jewish tradition.

    HNRS 2000-01, HNRS Colloq: Research & Exhibition, M 10:50 - 11:50 AM, Hawley Almstedt
    HNRS 2000-02, HNRS Colloq: Research & Exhibition, M 12:15 - 01:15 PM, Hawley Almstedt
    HNRS 2000-03, HNRS Colloq: Research & Exhibition, W 12:15 - 01:15 PM, Hawley Almstedt

    This course, required for all students of the University Honors Program, is an orientation to the practice of research and creative activity from a scholarly point of view. It introduces developing scholars and creative people to the methods, habits, assumptions, and culture of pursuing knowledge. This includes 1) the formulation by the student of a problem worthy of in-depth study, 2) the articulation of how that problem can be addressed, and 3) the public exhibition of the student's work. In short, the course introduces students to formal, mentored academic research and creative work.

    HNRS 2100 01 Honors Hist Analysis & Perspec MW 9:55 11:35 Drummond, Elizabeth
    HNRS 2100 02 Honors Hist Analysis & Perspec MW 1:45 3:25 Drummond, Elizabeth

    Complicating Race in European History

    The discipline of history has long been intertwined with European nation- and empire-building projects. Too often European history courses have rested on an assumption that Europe is a white and Christian space, thus marginalizing or even excluding altogether the experiences of Black, Asian, and Middle Eastern people in Europe, as well as of Jews, Muslims, and other Europeans who have been racialized as non-white at various points in history. In recent years, however, there has been much discussion of "decolonizing" the discipline, in particular of decentering whiteness and of integrating decolonial and anti-racist approaches to history. In Complicating Race in European History, we will take up this challenge. We will use an intersectional analytical framework to examine how white Europeans imagined and deployed race in the modern period, including how those uses changed over time and in different situations. We will also center the experiences of people who have often been excluded from dominant narratives of European history because of race (people of African, Asian, and Middle Eastern descent in Europe, both migrants and their European-born descents) or because they have often been racialized as non-white by white and Christian Europeans (Jews, Muslims, Romani, Eastern Europeans, Irish), as well as the dynamics between and among those populations. How does our understanding of European history change when we don't take whiteness as a given, as the norm, and when we center those groups that have traditionally been pushed to the margins? We will look at Europe through a transnational lens, examining historical dynamics such as race, migration, citizenship, national identity, colonialism, Blackness, Jewishness, etc. throughout Europe, including both comparative analyses and discussions of how some of these dynamics transcend the borders of the nation-state (e.g., experiences of anti-Black racism or antisemitism).

    HNRS 2200 01 Hnrs Nature of Sci, Tech, Math TR 3:40 5:20 Hardy, David

    Brain, Mind, and Metrics

    This course can be summarized as brain, mind, and metrics. We will: (1) examine various techniques in the assessment of brain structure and function, with an emphasis on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), a technique that has transformed the field of cognitive neuroscience; (2) consider different conceptualizations of mind, historical and current; and (3) analyze, qualitatively and sometimes quantitatively (no background in statistics is required), associations between brain and mind, including the numerous attempts at bridging the seemingly categorical divide here. Along the way, we will discuss mind reading, decision making and free will, criminal behavior, responsibility, mental illness, and other meaty topics.

    HNRS 3000 01 HNRS Colloq: Edge What We Know F 2:00 4:00 Honors Leadership Team

    This course seeks to introduce you to the boundaries of knowledge and art within the fields of selected LMU professors…and how they crossed them. The course builds upon the prior Honors Colloquia (HNRS 1000 and 2000) and leads directly to the Honors Thesis (HNRS 5100). This colloquia is built around a series of curated public talks from LMU faculty. Each professor will talk about how and why an area captured their curiosity and interest, building on themes of purpose from Intro to Honors. As you did in Research & Exhibition, the speakers will then proceed to talk about how they identified the "edge" of that area and determined a way to move it forward. In so doing, they contributed to their field and took this "edge" further out for future scholars and creatives—something which we hope that you, too, will accomplish with your Honors Thesis. Your engagement with these professors will be captured in a class-produced podcast season with one episode devoted to each speaker.

    HNRS 3200 01, Honors Literary Analysis, TR 8:00 9:40 Younger, Kelly
    HNRS 3200 02, Honors Literary Analysis, TR 9:55 11:35 Younger, Kelly

    Fairy Tales carry widespread cultural messages about survival, growing up, fears and anxieties, morality and mortality, and about how humans attempt to make meaning in an uncertain world. This course examines fairy tales both vertically (how they originated and evolved) and horizontally (how they spread and keep spreading and to what extent they have roots in our unconscious minds). We will look closely at the constructions of both types of evaluation in HNRS 3200, using fairy tales as the focus for our literary analysis and critical writing. We will read modern adaptations of old stories, asking why, in this historical time when so many more realistic stories demand our attention, would a cultural obsession with fairy tales arise?

    HNRS 4200 01, Beyond Good and Evil, TR 9:55 11:35 Mason, Joshua
    HNRS 4200 02, Beyond Good and Evil, TR 11:50 1:30 Mason, Joshua

    This course approaches three main issues: 1) the foundations and reality of moral values, 2) decision making about right and wrong, and 3) what to do about the world's various problems. The first focus is on meta-ethics and the arguments among skeptics, relativists, and objectivists about the grounds of our ethical beliefs. Together, we will inquire into the nature and existence of values like "good" and "evil." The second explores normative ethics and the arguments between virtue theory, deontology, utilitarianism, liberalism, care ethics, and others, over how to find out what is the right thing to do. These traditional methods help us inquire into how to make responsible moral judgments. The third will have you look at the news and the world we live in, and apply the theories we learn in class.

  • HNRS 1100 01 Honors Philosophical Inquiry TR 9:40 11:10 Stackle, Erin
    HNRS 1100 02 Honors Philosophical Inquiry TR 1:00 2:30 Stackle, Erin

    While we all have implicit criteria for what counts as real and what counts as knowledge, we often do not sufficiently consider these criteria. This course investigates what is most real and how we can know. We will consider these questions in conversation with thinkers like Plato, St. Thomas Aquinas, Descartes, etc.

    HNRS 1200 01 Honors Theological Inquiry MW 2:20 3:50 Swanson, Eric

    The Diverse Voices of American Buddhism
    This course will have students critically examine the development of American Buddhism by focusing on how members of marginalized groups are responding to contemporary issues of race, representation, suffering, and liberation through the lens of the Buddhist teachings. By doing so, students are encouraged to reflect on how the Buddhist teachings continue to be reshaped by its communities of faith while also recognizing and celebrating the diversity of voices that constitute American Buddhism.

    HNRS 1200 02 Honors Theological Inquiry TR 11:20 12:50 Radler, Charlotte

    This course introduces students to the meaning and significance of spiritual beliefs and practices in its distinctively Christian expressions and—to a more limited extent—to expressions associated with other religious traditions. The course adopts a comparative and interdisciplinary approach, teaching across different cultural contexts (e.g., Europe, the Middle East, North Africa, North, Central, and South America), religious traditions (Christianity, Judaism, and Islam), and disciplines (e.g., theology, history, philosophy, and women's studies). The focus of the course is on "lived religion" — the embodied, eclectic and often improvisational character of spiritual experience, both collective and individual. The course will discuss such ultimate questions as: Who am I and what is my place in the whole scheme of things? What is of ultimate value? What makes for a meaningful life? How can I best make sense of love, suffering, loss, and death?

    HNRS 2100 01 Honors Hist Analysis & Perspec TR 4:20 5:45 Carla, Bittel
    HNRS 2100 02 Honors Hist Analysis & Perspec TR 5:55 7:20 Carla, Bittel

    Science, Nature, and Society
    This course examines the history of European and North American societies and cultures through the lens of science and nature from the sixteenth century to the present. It traces the history of ideas about science and nature in relation to broader social, economic and political changes, demonstrating the inseparability of science and social context. It also follows the cross-cultural and trans-oceanic proliferation and exchange of ideas, natural objects, and disease via exploration, colonialism, and imperialism; it explores European contact with indigenous peoples, animals, and other cultures. In the process, it examines nature as a historical locus of knowledge, power, and politics. Ultimately, students will understand the history of nature to become active and critical consumers of science, medicine, and technology today.

    HNRS 2200 01 Hnrs Nature of Sci, Tech, Math TR 9:40 11:10 Strauss, Eric

    Imagining the Resilient City: How Urban Ecology Helps to Shape Just, Verdant and Sustainable Urban Communities
    The study of human-dominated landscapes, such as cities, is being transformed by a new theory called Ecological Resilience. The key features of this approach include the recognition that healthy ecosystems are dynamic, profoundly interconnected and closer to nature that you might expect. Using this lens, our course will explore the integrated nature of urbanized landscapes and the communities of people who live there.

    HNRS 2200 02 Hnrs Nature of Sci, Tech, Math W 6:00pm 9:00pm Plecnik, James

    Business and Tax Technology
    The purpose of this course is to train students in the technologies and research methods used by ever-transforming modern businesses. Leveraging these various technologies and research databases, students will demonstrate the ability to solve real-world problems and conduct research on novel business/tax questions.

    HNRS 2300 01 Honors Literary Analysis M 4:20 7:20 Clawson, David

    Honors Literary Analysis. Through narratives focused on female, bipoc, and/or lgbtq characters, the class will alternate between prose (mostly fiction) and film/TV analysis, emphasizing the commonalities as well as the differences between the mediums.

    HNRS 2300 02 Honors Literary Analysis MW 12:40 2:10 Neel, Alexandra

    This course introduces students to different ways of interpreting short stories and novels, including works by Jamaica Kincaid, Margaret Atwood, and Emily Saint John Mandel. We'll explore the formal and technical aspects of fiction: we'll discuss point of view, setting, character, plot, tone, and talk about how these aspects of literature affect the meaning and power of particular narratives. In other words, you will learn how to read literature closely and will acquire the technical and critical vocabulary necessary to say what is happening in various genres. Here are some questions we will return to over the course of the semester: How do authors use the resources of literature to engage with the social and political issues of their times? What kind of perspective does literature offer?

    HNRS 2300 03 Honors Literary Analysis TR 2:40 4:10 Peters, Kevin

    Literary analysis is not an attempt to define literature but to understand the immersive record of Being expressed by what is called literature. In this course, we will explore the relationship between literary theory and literary analysis. And, we will learn the analytical competencies that make literary analysis indispensable to literary scholars and casual readers, data miners, preachers, advertisers, and the intelligence community. In short, to know what a text means, we first must be able to say how it means.

    HNRS 3000 01 HNRS Colloq: Post-Bacc Success F 2:00 4:00 Zink, Trevor

    The Edge of What We Know
    This first-ever offering of a reimagined HNRS 3000 Colloquium takes us through a speaker series and accompanying discussions, readings, and videos that explore how faculty in an array of fields find, investigate, and eventually step across the edge of what we know. It is a course designed to explore how thinkers in any field and destined for any occupation can create and share new knowledge, and in so doing, add value to their own lives, their professional prospects, and society at large.

    HNRS 3110 01 Beyond Good and Evil TR 1:00 2:30 Treanor, Brian

    Together we will be thinking through issues related to ethics and the environment, both taken broadly. We will look at both classic issues and problems like climate change, resource depletion, population and consumption, as well as personal and philosophical issues regarding how you, as an individual, related to the elemental non-human environment. Thus, our class will consider theoretical, practical, and 'poetic' aspects of our ethical relationship with the more-than-human world.

    HNRS 3110 01 Beyond Good and Evil MW 12:40 2:10 Mason, Joshua

    The conception of a human being as a rational and autonomous individual has been central to ethical theorizing across the history of western philosophy. We will start this course by examining the ways in which an individual soul, self, or agent has been taken as the target of ethical evaluations, such as "good" and "evil." Along the way we will consider the basis of ethical concepts such as virtue, rights, and equality. In the second half of the course, we will work through some challenges to the basic assumptions about foundational individualism, particularly those challenges that spring from conceptions of human nature we find in eastern philosophies of Buddhism, Daoism, and Confucianism. Through the semester we will read classical materials from Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Hume, Kant, Mill, and Nietzsche. We will also read recent works from Henry Rosemont, Jr. and Hans Georg Moeller—Against Individualism and The Moral Fool, respectively.

  • FFYS 1000 - First Year Seminar: Black LA

    Prof. Jennifer Williams

    FFYS 1000 - First Year Seminar: Sex, Science, and Society

    Prof. Mairead Sullivan

    FFYS 1000 - First Year Seminar: Brand Activism

    Prof. Brett Marroquín

    FFYS 1000 - First Year Seminar: On the Technological Sublime

    Prof. Susan Scheibler

    HNRS 1000 - Honors Colloquium: Introduction to Honors

    Prof. Trevor Zink

    HNRS 1100 - Honors Philosophical Inquiry

    Prof. Daniel Speak

    This course will be a topical introduction to philosophy by way of seminar discussion of a few core philosophical questions— for example, about the existence God, about the limits of our knowledge, and about the freedom of our wills... or maybe that's just the cover story I tell

    HNRS 1200 - Honors Theological Inquiry

    Prof. Kim Harris

    Faith Lived: personal, collective, theological, cultural, and artistic responses to religious belief – relationships, morality, worship, and daily living.

    HNRS 1200 - Honors Theological Inquiry

    Prof. Amir Hussain

    The realities of religious diversity cannot be ignored. Increasingly, people live, work, and pray alongside persons of many faith traditions (including no faith tradition). It is therefore essential to learn how to negotiate this reality: theologically, ethically, and spiritually. This course will introduce honors students to the study of comparative theology.

    HNRS 1200 - Honors Theological Inquiry

    Prof. Tracy Tiemeier

    This course takes a comparative and decolonial approach to theological inquiry, examining Hindu, Buddhist, and Christian thought and practice as they are embedded in wider systems of power

    HNRS 2000 - Honors Colloquium: Research and Exhibition

    Prof. John David Dionisio

    HNRS 2100 - Honors Historical Analysis and Perspectives

    Prof. Constance Chen

    This Global History of Food course will use interdisciplinary methodologies to examine the ways in which food has the power to both define and reflect cultural, socioeconomic, and political conditions and discourses within a transnational context.

    HNRS 2200 - Honors Nature of Science, Technology, and Mathematics

    Prof. Vandana Thadani

    Social science inquiry will be explored in the context of a single, topical, pressing social issue such as people's willingness to believe conspiracy theories, or factors that may influence people's willingness to advocate for equity and advocate against discrimination.

    HNRS 2300 - Honors Literary Analysis

    Prof. Kevin Peters

    Literary analysis is not an attempt to define literature but to understand the immersive record of Being expressed by what we call a literary text. Along the way, we will learn the competencies that make literary analysis indispensable to literary scholars and casual readers, data miners and preachers, advertisers and the intelligence community.

    HNRS 3000 - Honors Colloquium: Post-Baccalaureate Success

    Prof. Cassidy Alvarado

    An orientation to opportunities that await students beyond LMU (including national and international fellowships, postgrad service, and career opportunities) and preparation for pursuing them effectively

    HNRS 3110 - Beyond Good and Evil

    Prof. Andrew Dilts

    Beyond Good and Evil is a course in critical ethical and moral theory, studying the cultural and ideological formations that have shaped our understandings of ethical, social, political, and economic questions in our contemporary moment.